WILLIAM LUDWIG LUTGENS WINS THE EECKMAN ART PRIZE
FOR CONTEMPORARY DRAWING 2017

For the second year in a row, Art on Paper, the contemporary drawing fair in collaboration with BOZAR, is launching - with the support of EECKMAN ART & INSURANCE - a call for projects aimed at young artists and art students whose work reflects an affinity with drawing. The winner receives a production and transportation budget and gets the opportunity to present his/her works throughout the course of the fair.

It is with great enthusiasm that the jury - consisting of Paul Dujardin (Bozar), Catherine Henkinet (ISELP), Marc Ruyters (H ART), Cedric Liénart Jeude (Eeckman Art & Insurance), Johana Carrier (Journal Roven) and Kasper Bosmans Artist) selected William Ludwig Lutgens as winner of this second edition of the Eeckman Art Prize for contemporary drawing. The jury praises Lutgens both for the graphic quality of his work and for its political and social relevance.

William Ludwig Lutgens (Born in 1991 in Turnhout) studied at St Lucas School of Arts Antwerp, where he obtained a first Master's degree in Illustration and a second in Research & Design. He lives and works in Ghent, where he’s currently following a postgraduate course at HISK (Higher Institute of Fine Arts). In his work, Lutgens combines autobiographical elements with social issues to denounce abuses and hypocrisy in a language that is both political and comical. Like a comedian he complements references to different subjects trough the use of personal anecdotes in a form similar to that of  improvisational jazz, looking for templates and narratives to highlight, not forcing his perspective, but leaving the spectator somewhere in a limbo, between two moments: the playful and the serious, amusement and discomfort. He’s also the driving force behind the online publication "Het Geïllustreerd blad/The Illustrated Paper", a politically incorrect daily newspaper founded in 2006.

For Art on Paper, Lutgens will create a new installation including wall drawings, texts, prints and framed drawings that evoke the subjectivity of the viewer's experience. What happens to the artist’s ideas and the intention of the work when it’s viewed, read and interpretated? What remains of the original desire of the creator when the work is transferred?
 


William Ludwig Lutgens, Caramella.

JURY EECKMAN PRIZE

Catherine Henkinet / Curator ISELP
Cédric Liénart / Eeckman Art & Insurance
Johana Carrier / Editor Revue Roven
Kasper Bosmans / Artist
Marc Ruyters / Editor H-ART
Paul Dujardin / Director BOZAR
Reyn van der Lugt / Art collector